KYLE MOOTY

About every four years or so I write about how parents need to grow up and be more like their kids regarding some matters. If my math is correct, that means I’ve had about 10 such articles that have obviously fallen on blind eyes around the south and southwest... and whatever category Missouri falls into,

I’ll try again, although likely in vain.

Last week, videos surfaced of a brawl between parents at a baseball game in Colorado involving 7-year-olds – SEVEN! Some, it seems, became outraged over a call by the umpire, who was all of 13 – THIRTEEN!

There were punches thrown, so wild in fact that a manhunt was issued for one of the men who took part in the all-out, knock-down, drag-out fight – ON THE FIELD... WITH KIDS WATCHING!

Perhaps those kids will grow up fighting at their kids’ games, or being so belligerent in the stands that they’ll: 1) embarrass their kids to no end; or 2) fight over a controversial call at their kids’ games when they grow up... physically, not mentally, of course.

I believe every parent captured on video throwing punches at the game should get a minimum of 30 days behind bars on stupidity alone. The kids probably need some kind of counseling. Otherwise, they’ll probably associate playing what should be a fun game with angering their parents to the point of fighting. Be proud parents! Be proud.

The loud, obnoxious fan in the stands is just that outside of the game, whether or not he or she thinks higher of themselves. I’ve seen parents cross the line at every sport I’ve covered. I once covered a basketball game where a player stopped his dribble around midcourt to tell his father, who never stopped berating his son during a game, “DAD, SHUT UP!” While most believe that is rarely if ever acceptable, there was a mild applause for the kid that evening. The father left the arena at halftime and never returned. Be Proud, Daddy! Be proud.

Are these individuals acting out trying to compensate for their playing days? Surely they don’t normally act not that awful in public.

On the other end of the spectrum are players who are taught valuable lessons right before our eyes.

Anyone watching Friday night’s College World Series matchup between Louisville and Vanderbilt likely saw the standout Louisville pitcher throwing a gem against the Commodores through eight innings, yet acting like a jerk as he taunted Vandy players after a strikeout to end the inning. One broadcaster even said at the time, “That’s a bad look. They should pull him now.” Another said, “Don’t poke the bear.”

Too late, Vanderbilt rallied for two runs in the ninth inning and beat the Cardinals, 3-2, eliminating Louisville and advancing to this week’s finals against Michigan. Lessons learned? Probably not.

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